Jobs & Justice Campaign

Recent Interview About Jobs & Justice Campaign Radio Show Idea: http://www.steinershow.org/radio/the-marc-steiner-show/november-15-2011-segment-2

Past Media Coverage

Washington Informer: Alumna Maria Ellis talks about joining the HU March for Jobs and Justice. http://www.washingtoninformer.com

NBC News: http://www.ktiv.com/story/15888572/latest-developments-in-the-global-occupy-protests

CBS News: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-501369_162-20126345/latest-developments-in-the-global-occupy-protests/

Fox News: http://www.myfoxdc.com/dpp/news/howard-students-planning-occupy-wall-street-protest-march-102711

ABC News: http://www.wjla.com/articles/2011/10/howard-u-students-faculty-to-march-supporting-occupy-wall-street–68412.html

Washington Post: http://www.washingtonpost.com/

Washington Examiner: http://washingtonexaminer.com/local

India Times: http://oneclick.indiatimes.com/photo/0eXv7ed8MJ08q?q=Canada

Hilltop Newspaper: http://www.thehilltoponline.com/news/howard-students-march-with-occupy

Yahoo News: http://news.yahoo.com/photos/howard-university-alumni-students-march-treasury-department-washington-photo-235625923.html

New America Media: http://newamericamedia.org/2011/11/howard-university-adds-its-voice-to-occupy-movement.php

The Republic: http://www.therepublic.com/view/story

Zimbo News, Occupy DC Holds March And Rally At U.S. Chamber Of Commerce: http://www.zimbio.com/pictures

History of the Movement for Jobs & Justice

On Friday, October 28, 2011, Howard University alumni, students, faculty led others from the DC area in a March for Jobs and Justice.  Starting with a rally in front of Frederick Douglas Hall, the march traveled outside the gates of Howard’s Georgia Avenue campus to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.  The marchers traveled through working-class neighborhoods of the nation’s capitol, and along the way recruited others from the 99% of Americans who own less than 1% of the country’s wealth to join the march.  Starting with just around 25, the march linked up with members of both Occupy encampments in DC (one on 15th & K streets, and the other at Freedom Plaza atPennsylvania Avenue).  At the end of the march, there were dozens outside the Chamber of Commerce demanding an end to outsourcing, an end to free trade agreements, and an end to blockade of another stimulus to create jobs made in the USA.

Contact: Talib I. Karim, Esq., 202-256-0499, Talib@talibkarim.com

Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=293788753984338&mid=5101.

March Goals:

Call for passage of bills by Congress to increase jobs for HU alumni and students as well as alumni and students of other institutions.

Bring attention to the 110 million people in the U.S. who are underemployed or unemployed. This alarming number accounts for an estimated 85% of the African American community.

Draw attention to negative impact of economic policies like free trade agreements on US jobs.

Call on U.S. government to end wars and reinvest in job creating green energy projects and other technologies designed to make life better for Americans and the world.

Highlight the $1 Trillion in U.S. Student loan debt and call on Congress to stimulate economy by forgiving loans of those who are unemployed or underemployed.

March Principles:

The Occupy movement, which has spread to DC, has raised awareness of the fact that 99% of the wealth is owned by 1% of the population. Further, the movement has drawn a connection between corporate greed and the lack of American jobs.

Protesters criticize failed decisions by business and government leaders for the country’s lack of jobs such as the policy of outsourcing manufacturing and energy production to “developing nations” in favor of service sector jobs.

Its clear that the service sector (such as the legal field) has been unable to provide adequate employment, resulting in thousands of unemployed and underemployed lawyers in the nation’s capitol, many being compelled to work as temporary workers reviewing documents for $25-$35 dollars an hour in slave labor like conditions.

The unemployment and underemployment figures in the U.S. mean that only approximately 15% of the African American community is fully and gainfully employed.

This statistic explains why large numbers of grads from institutions of higher education across the country face increased challenges finding good work despite their academic achievement.  Similarly, today’s college students are increasingly uncertain of their employment prospects upon graduation.

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